Levulan Photodynamic Therapy (Levulan PDT) is an advanced treatment for actinic keratoses (AKs), or rough-textured, dry, scaly patches on the skin that can lead to skin cancer. Levulan PDT, a 2-part treatment course, is unique because it uses a light activated drug therapy to destroy AKs.

Levulan Kerastick Topical Solution is applied to the AK. The solution is then absorbed by the AK cells where it is converted to a chemical that makes the cells extremely sensitive to light. When the AK cells are exposed to the Blu-U blue light illuminator, a reaction occurs which destroys the AK cells.

The short, 2-part treatment course is convenient and fits your lifestyle:

  • Low downtime*
  • No prescription to fill
  • No daily medication to remember
  • Excellent cosmetic response1
  • No scarring reported to date

Levulan is commonly used to effectively treat acne. Levulan eliminates sebasceous glands thereby eliminating any further flare up of acne.

Who should NOT take Levulan?

Levulan Kerastick should not be taken by patients who have cutaneous photosensitivity at wavelengths at 400-450 nm, porphyria, or known allergies to porphyrins, and in patients with known sensitivity to any of the components of the Levulan Kerastick for Topical Solution.

Levulan Kerastick has not been tested on patients with inherited or acquired coagulation defects. There have been no formal studies of the interaction of Levulan Kerastick for Topical Solution with any other drugs and no drug-specific interactions were noted during any of the controlled clinical trials. It is possible that concomitant use of other known photosensitizing agents might increase the photosensitivity reaction of actinic keratosis treated with the Levulan Kerastick. It is important to tell your physician if you are taking any oral medications or using any topical prescription or non-prescription products on your face or scalp. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or nursing.

What are the possible side effects?

The most common side effects include scaling/crusting, hypo/hyper-pigmentation, itching, stinging, and/or burning, erythema and edema. Severe stinging and/or burning at one or more lesions being treated were reported by at least 50% of patients at some time during the treatment.

What precautions should be taken?

Patients should avoid exposure of the photosensitive treatment sites to sunlight or bright indoor light prior to and at least 48 hours after blue light treatment. Exposure may result in a stinging and/or burning sensation and may cause erythema or edema of the lesions. Sunscreens will not protect against photosensitivity reactions caused by visible light.